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"Werowocomoco: Seat of Power" Special Exhibition Through June 30, 2011

“Werowocomoco: Seat of Power” Special Exhibition
Through June 30, 2011

Virginia Indian Heritage Lectures
June 4 and June 18, 2011

Jamestown Settlement

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  thumb_Helen Rountree - June 4 Virginia Indian Heritage Lecture   thumb_Martin Gallivan - June 18 Virginia Indian Heritage Lecture

June 4 – Helen C. Rountree, “English Myth-Making and Indian Reality: Early English Stereotypes of the Virginia Indians”

 June 18 – Martin D. Gallivan, “Werowocomoco: Seat of Power”

thumb_Aerial view of Werowocomoco-Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation photo

A bird’s-eye view of Werowocomoco, located on the York River in modern-day Gloucester County, offers a perspective of the place that was once home to Powhatan, paramount chief of 30-some Indian tribes in Virginia’s coastal region in the 1600s.Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation photo.

thumb_Werowocomoco overview and Powhatan house model in exhibit

The Werowocomoco site is depicted in a scale model in the center of Jamestown Settlement’s “Werowocomoco: Seat of Power” exhibition. A building discovered by archaeologists at a dsitinct part of the site is thought to have been used for high-status social and ceremonial functions is included in the model and re-created on a larger scale next to it. Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation photo.

A Townsend pottery shard from Werowocomoco dating to A.D. 900-1600.Courtesy of Robert F. and C. Lynn Ripley.
A late Woodland knife from Werowocomoco dating to A.D. 900-1600.Courtesy of Robert F. and C. Lynn Ripley.
Late Woodland projectile points from Werowocomoco dating to A.D. 900-1600.Courtesy of Robert F. and C. Lynn Ripley.
An early Archaic Palmer quartzite projectile point from Werowocomoco dating to 8000-7200 B.C. Courtesy of Robert F. and C. Lynn Ripley.
An early Archaic St. Albans quartz projectile point from Werowocomoco dating to 6800-6500 B.C. Courtesy of Robert F. and C. Lynn Ripley.
A copper alloy piece found at Werowocomoco, 17th century, Europe. A large quantity of copper recovered from the site is of European manufacture and has the same chemical composition as similar copper pieces found at Jamestown. Courtesy of Robert F. and C. Lynn Ripley.

thumb_English rolled bead copper-17th century-Ripley photo

A copper alloy piece, shown here rolled into a bead, found at Werowocomoco, 17th century, Europe. A large quantity of copper recovered from the site is of European manufacture and has the same chemical composition as similar copper pieces found at Jamestown. Courtesy of Robert F. and C. Lynn Ripley.

thumb_Map of Virginia, John Smith, 1612

John Smith’s Map of Virginia, 1612, shows the location of Werowocomoco and features in the upper left corner an illustration of Powhatan at Werowocomoco. Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation collection.

thumb_Chaco Canyon effigy vessel-private collection

Black-on-White painted effigy vessel in the shape of a bird, Chaco Canyon, New Mexico, A.D. 900-1050. Private collection.

thumb_Chaco Canyon painted pottery-private collection

Black-on-White painted pottery, Chaco Canyon, New Mexico, A.D. 900-1050.Private collection.

thumb_Powhatan statue with cases

A statue of Powhatan in “Werowocomoco: Seat of Power” special exhibition at Jamestown Settlement leads to exhibit cases filled with artifacts from Werowocomoco.  Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation photo.

thumb_Late Woodland bear bone mask-scraping tool-Crab Orchard Museum photo

A ceremonial mask made from upper jaw of a bear and a hide-scraping tool made from a bear long bone, late Woodland period. Bears are a symbol of power for many American Indian cultures. Courtesy of the Historic Crab Orchard Museum and Pioneer Park, Tazewell, Va.