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Virtual Learning Experiences

For more than 30 years, the Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation has been a strong partner in education, serving teachers and students with on-site educational visits to Jamestown Settlement and the American Revolution Museum at Yorktown and through classroom outreach programs. As many school districts begin the 2020-2021 school year with virtual or hybrid student learning, the Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation is extending its commitment to educators across Virginia and the nation by now offering new virtual learning experiences.

Virtual education programs from the Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation are designed to deliver the same inquiry-based, interactive programming teachers have come to expect, with adjustments for virtual delivery to classrooms and individual students learning at home. If you have participated in classroom outreach or field trip programs in the past, associated sessions and related content are listed at the end of the program description. And since we know that this is a new world for everyone, we will continue to work with educators to deliver the content most needed by their students.

For more information about these educational offerings or to schedule a virtual experience, contact group.reservations@jyf.virginia.gov.


EXPLORING THE PAST
35- to 60-Minute Live Learning Session
– Depending on Grade Level.

$50/Program per Virginia Classroom; $125 for All Others.
Using WebEx and other virtual learning platforms, students can join a Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation educator as they explore early Virginia and United States history together. Topics examine the Powhatan Indians, early English settlement at Jamestown, three cultures that converged in Virginia, causes and events of the American Revolution and stories of real people who shaped our early history. These inquiry-based educational programs are designed to be interactive and thought provoking, allowing students to explore the past while honing their skills in critical thinking, communication and historical thinking. For more information or to schedule, contact group.reservations@jyf.virginia.gov.

Jamestown – From England to Virginia: Why did England decide to send settlers to Virginia? What did they hope to gain and who were the people who decided to sail to an unknown future? By examining reproduction artifacts and other primary sources, students can answer these and other questions as they discover why the English established Jamestown and Englishmen traveled across the Atlantic to an unfamiliar land. Students can examine early government, English interactions with the Powhatan Indians and arrival of the first recorded Africans to British North America.
• Comparable to Life at Jamestown.
• Designed to meet Virginia SOLs: VS.1; VS.2a,b,c; VS.3; VS.4; USI.1; USI.2d, USI.3; USI.4, USI.5.

Powhatan Indians – an Eastern Woodland Tribe: Explore the lives and society of the Powhatan Indians, an Eastern Woodlands tribe inhabiting regions of Virginia long before 1607. Using inquiry methods and reproduction artifacts, explore the Powhatan Indian culture, including roles of different members of its society, government structure and how the Powhatan Indians used natural resources to produce tools, clothing, houses and food.
• Comparable to Powhatan Indian World, Powhatan’s People and People, Plants and Animals.
• Designed to meet Virginia SOLs: 2.1, 2.3a, 2.7a, 2.9, 2.10, VS.1; VS.2; VS.3g; VS.4b; USI.1; USI.3b,c; USI.4b.

Jamestown – Three Cultures, One Land: Students are carried on a dynamic, inquiry-based exploration of the three cultures that converged at Jamestown, the first permanent English settlement in North America. Using reproduction artifacts and primary sources, students compare and contrast the cultures of the Powhatan (an Eastern Woodlands tribe), west central Africans and English who lived in early America during the beginning of the 17th century. Using this knowledge, students examine the interrelations between the three groups and discover how the legacies of each culture live on in 21st-century America.

Trending Toward Revolution: Imagine if social media existed during the years leading up to the American Revolution. Would the American colonists “unfriend” England on Facebook, regram Paul Revere’s engraving of the Boston Massacre and retweet Thomas Paine’s “Common Sense”? In this new and engaging program, students use familiar, modern-day forms of communication to examine the political and economic events and actions that led to the American Revolution. Using primary sources and artifacts, delve deeper into such dividing topics as the Proclamation of 1763, Sugar Act, Stamp Act, Tea Act, Intolerable Acts and many more. The program concludes by determining the importance, then and now, of such documents as the Declaration of Independence.

American Revolution – A Movement to Freedom: What was life like for those who fought in the American Revolution? What were the perspectives of the different people living in the colonies at that time – Virginia farm families, artisans, enslaved people and American Indians to name a few? Through inquiry-based exploration of artifacts and primary source documents, students gain a better understanding of the American Revolution and the important roles individuals and groups played in winning independence from England.
• Comparable to From Rebels to Patriots, Road to Independence, Colonial Life and Life of a Private.
• Designed to meet Virginia SOLs: VS.1; VS.4, VS.5; USI.1; USI.5; USI.6.

Early Virginia – People, Places and Things: How has Virginia changed over time? In this interactive exploration of early Virginia history, students compare and contrast the beginnings of English colonization at Jamestown through the American Revolution and compare what they learn with the Virginia of today. Special emphasis is placed on natural surroundings, food, shelter and clothing. Students also learn about important people in Virginia’s history, including Powhatan, Pocahontas, Christopher Newport and George Washington.
• Comparable to Virginia Then.
• Designed to meet Virginia SOLs: 1.1; 1.2; 1.3a,b,c; 1.5a,b; 1.6; 2.1; 2.2.

For more information or to schedule this virtual experience, contact group.reservations@jyf.virginia.gov.


HISTORY INVESTIGATORS
At-Home Educational Content
+ 20-Minute Live Learning Session.

$50/Program per Virginia Classroom; $125 for All Others. 
$10/Program per Family for Homeschoolers & Individual At-Home Learners.
Specially designed for hybrid classes or all-virtual learning situations, students start by honing their historical thinking skills as they work at home using standards-based content, videos and activities curated by the Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation. Students answer key questions as they explore the real people and events that helped to shape early Virginia and United States history. Next, teachers can schedule an interactive, live learning session that virtually (from the classroom or their home) connects their students with a museum educator to discuss the results of their investigations. Programs are designed to develop skills in critical thinking, communication, creative thinking and citizenship. Special sessions will be available for homeschool families and individual at-home learners with registration at $10 per family. For more information or to schedule, contact group.reservations@jyf.virginia.gov.

Jamestown – A Cultural Convergence: What do you think the Powhatan Indians thought of the English when they arrived in 1607? How were the west central Africans, English and Powhatan Indians similar and different? What aspects of the three cultures of Jamestown survive into the 21st century? How was life in Virginia different from life in England for the early settlers? These are just some of the questions students may answer during this hybrid program.
• Comparable to Life at Jamestown and Cultures at Jamestown.
• Designed to meet Virginia SOLs: VS.1; VS.2a,b,c; VS.3; VS.4; USI.1; USI.2d, USI.3; USI.4, USI.5.

Powhatan Indians – Examination of a Society: What was Powhatan Indian culture like? How did they use natural resources and what can we learn from them? How did the land impact the Powhatan Indian way of life? Students work to discover the answers to these and other questions during this program.
• Comparable to Powhatan Indian World, Powhatan’s People and People, Plants and Animals.
• Designed to meet Virginia SOLs: 2.1, 2.3a, 2.7a, 2.9, 2.10, VS.1; VS.2; VS.3g; VS.4b; USI.1; USI.3b,c; USI.4b.

American Revolution – Formation of a New Nation: Would you have sided with the British or the Patriots during the American Revolution? How might an enslaved person view the American Revolution? How about a farmer? A merchant? Students explore perspectives and choices people made during the American Revolution.
• Comparable to From Rebels to Patriots, Road to Independence, Colonial Life and Life of a Private.
• Designed to meet Virginia SOLs: VS.1; VS.4, VS.5; USI.1; USI.5; USI.6.

Against Their Will – West Central African Culture and Its Perseverance in a New Land: Brought against their will, west central Africans were taken from a sophisticated and complex society with a rich culture. Students learn about life in west central Africa prior to European encroachment, how this rich culture persevered in the face of great adversity and how the skills of many of those brought to Jamestown allowed for the colony’s eventual success.

CSI – John Smith: Was the gunpowder injury that sent John Smith back to England in 1609 an accident, a crime or an attempt to sabotage the colony? Using primary sources, expert witnesses and photographs of physical evidence, students investigate the answer to this question. Through a guided 30-minute discussion, students learn if they were correct in their hypothesis.

Everyday Life in Revolutionary Virginia: Through the analysis of primary sources and descriptions of objects, students work in virtual or in-person collaborative teams to understand the lives of ordinary 18th-century Virginians during the American Revolution. In the facilitated discussion, students compare what they have learned with actual stories from that time period.

For more information or to schedule this virtual experience, contact group.reservations@jyf.virginia.gov.


VIRTUAL MUSEUM TOURS
30- to 45-Minute Museum Tour Video
+ 20-Minute Live Learning Session.

$50/Program per Virginia Classroom; $125 for All Others.
Students can enjoy an overview of early Virginia and the founding of the first permanent English settlement in North America while virtually “walking” through Jamestown Settlement’s re-creations of three 1607 ships, Powhatan town and English fort depicting 1610-14. Taking a trip through time to nearly two centuries later, students can virtually explore re-creations of a Revolutionary War encampment and 18th-century farm at the American Revolution Museum at Yorktown. By combining specially recorded video tours of each of the museum’s outdoor living-history areas with a live online discussion on early American history, students gain a better understanding of early 17th-century Virginia and/or the American Revolution. For more information or to schedule, contact group.reservations@jyf.virginia.gov.

Jamestown Settlement Virtual Tour: What are the lasting legacies of Jamestown? How was life forever changed by the convergence of three distinct cultures in Virginia? Students search for answers to these questions and more during a lively video tour, and then share their ideas with educators during a live facilitated discussion.

American Revolution Museum at Yorktown Virtual Tour: What are the choices colonists faced once the Revolutionary War erupted? What was life like for different people during this tumultuous time? During the video tour experience, students search for these answers and formulate questions to be answered during a live facilitated discussion.

For more information or to schedule this virtual experience, contact group.reservations@jyf.virginia.gov.


Located along Virginia’s scenic Colonial Parkway, Jamestown Settlement and the American Revolution Museum at Yorktown are open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily with new protective protocols and social-distancing procedures to carefully create a safe environment for everyone to enjoy. For more information about these educational offerings or to schedule a virtual experience, contact group.reservations@jyf.virginia.gov.